Winter Walking in Exeter

I would define our community as a pedestrian friendly town. Many people who live here forgo their dependence on vehicles in favor of the healthy alternative…. walking and biking.

This is my 3rd winter in Exeter and it still amazes me that the streets are cleared of snow in the morning in the worst of snowstorms. Not just the streets….the sidewalks are cleared, too. Where some communities threaten to fine citizens for not shoveling their sidewalks, folks here can step out of their homes and walk to town almost immediately following a storm. It’s nifty mini-tractors that do the trick in today, but clearing local sidewalks is nothing new.

Here’s an old film showing our walks being cleared by horse and plow:

Today it’s done by modern horsepower:

sidewalk tractors

Here and there in the downtown, there are small alleyways dug through snow mounds  providing parkers access to sidewalks and shops. I don’t know if the town shovels these paths or the shop owners, but it’s critical for business. Otherwise you’d take a hike to the end of the block… in the street!

Stella brought us perhaps our last real dump of snow two days ago. This morning under sunny skies, I bundled up, stepped outside and was greeted by piles of snow on the sides of dry roads and cleared sidewalks. I love this little community that keeps the streets and sidewalks clear and makes winter walking fun.  All of it is quite indicative of the value Exeter places on pedestrians and a healthier lifestyle.

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Bluebirds in Winter

We have a family of Eastern bluebirds (Sialia sialis) that is staying with us through the winter. The blues have been expanding their range for the last 10 years or so, and it’s not really unusual to see them in New England during the winter.

Two springs ago, mister gardener made a bluebird house and installed it along the edge of our garden. It wasn’t long before a pair claimed the house, fighting off chickadees, house sparrows and swallows for this real estate. During the summer, the pair fed on a variety of foods that they found in the landscape and we supplemented with a little snack of meal worms.

They only had one nesting that summer and the family wintered over. In the spring, the young were off to find their own territories and our parents managed three nestings last summer. So we have our original pair and 4 of the offspring wintering over this year.

Bluebirds in Winter

We have planted shrubs and trees that also provide food… such as serviceberry, viburnum, crabapple… for the fall when insects become more scarce. To help them out during the winter, we feed them meal worms but make sure we offer a mixed and balanced diet by adding bits of suet, hulled sunflower, and some berries and raisins. Bluebirds love to bathe!  A heated birdbath in the winter is a plus for bathing and drinking.

Bluebird with ice on beak

The blues generally roost at night in nearby pine forests, but will huddle in their bluebird house for shelter from time to time.

Bluebird in House

When I look out on snowy mornings and there is hardly a place for them to land, I wonder what these birds might be thinking. Could they be questioning their decision not to migrate to warm climes?  Just maybe…..

Bluebirds 2017

Top Ten Ways to Survive…

… a New England winter, especially if you’re a Southern transplant. I hear from friends in Virginia who say they’re still raking leaves in their yards. Our leaves in New Hampshire are hidden under 6″ of snow and ice. It seems the weatherman predicts Wintry Weather every other day around here. That means a little snow, rain, and sleet all at once combined with cold and blustery wind gusts. With these meteorological conditions, it’s easy to catch the dreaded Cabin Fever.  Some of our new acquaintances have kindly suggested a few of their favorite pastimes to get us out of the house.

10. Learn to ice skate on the pond out back. Not a chance.

9. Take up downhill skiing. Our bones are too brittle.

8. Snowmobiling. Well, maybe….

7. Snowshoeing. This looks favorable. We see folks our age out there.

6. Jogging. Not on your life. Black ice is rampant.

5. Skijoring. Have you ever heard of it? Skijoring is Norwegian for ski driving and it’s really gaining in popularity. Think of it as a cross between dog mushing and cross-country skiing. But not for us. We don’t have a death wish.

New York Times Skijoring

4. Hockey games. OK, we did that and loved it. Take a look at this adorable mini-hockey entertainment during halftime:

3. Exploring the area. Yes! Especially in a warm automobile with a GPS. Suggestions are sounding better.

2. Shopping. Portsmouth’s Market Street, voted one of New England’s Best Shopping Streets by Travel and Leisure Magazine. Now we’re talking!

1. Eating Out. Eureka! Our #1 favorite winter pastime so far is checking out area restaurants. And I’m happy to say we’re getting quite skilled at it. Restaurants are plentiful and varied. We’re having a great time wading through menus in different hamlets. The added bonus is a bit of personal insulation around the waistline to keep us warmer when the Wintry Weather hits.