From ICE to NICE

Although it was 31° on our first morning in South Carolina, it was a heck of a lot warmer than the 7° we left behind in New Hampshire.

Temperatures are unseasonably brisk here, reaching the high 40s or low 50s under sunny skies so far. Most people are sporting lightweight jackets and warm hats but not everyone. We do a double take when we spot the occasional brave soul in Bermuda shorts! “All are hardy Canadians,” say the locals.

Until the weather warms a little, we are concentrating on good food, especially the southern goodies I’ve missed…like those warm hush puppies I enjoyed at our first meal on Hilton Head.

Coligny Beach Park was a lunch destination yesterday followed by a walk on the beach…something we’d probably never choose to do in the high season due to the popularity of this wonderful beach.

Beach access takes you through the park on a boardwalk where you may stop to lounge on swings, benches or chairs in the sun or beneath gazebos. Outdoor showers, little changing rooms, restrooms, and free WiFi make it a perfect access for a beach day.

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Beach matting allows visitors to cross the wide expanse of soft sand down to the water’s edge where the few walkers and bikers are found.

Great place to work up an appetite for dinner!

Summer Vacay 2017

With small mountains of snow surrounding us this January 9, more pleasant thoughts are carrying us back to the warm days of the past summer. Our seasonal travels have taken us to visit several mountain lakes in the few years that we’ve lived in New England.

And last summer our vacation took us to a new one on our radar, a Maine lake where we enjoyed three generations of family fun with youngster from age 10 months to the really old folks (us!).

summer vacayThe small village is named Lovell, just over the border from New Hampshire, and the body of water is Kezar Lake, a gorgeous, deep, clean lake surrounded by the rural hills of Maine and New Hampshire’s White Mountains.

Kezar Lake, ME

Kezar Lake

It is a very quiet lake. Jet-skis are discouraged as well as loud motors on boats. We spotted a good share of kayaks and pontoon boats and early morning fishermen with small motors on john boats. At first glance you might think that you’re the only folks on the lake due to the deeply forested waterfront that hides camps and rental cottages.

After a couple of days, we boated around the 9-mile lake and could make out the modest cabins that blended so well into trees from afar. We weren’t the only people staying on the lake after all.

We were told by locals that this lake community frowns upon showiness and conspicuousness in architecture. Peer pressure seems to prevent the mcmansions from being built for the most part. We boated around the lake a couple of times to check out the real estate and were enchanted by what we saw.

Kezar LakeWe would boat awhile, but it was much more fun to turn off the motor and drift, allowing our able fishermen to have a moment to practice a little casting, then reeling in their (plastic) catch of the day.

Catching a plastic yellow perch

A great many of the camps we saw were rustic and small, very similar in color to the log cabin where we resided, dark brown stain and forest green trim.  Our accommodations were modern and comfortable indoors with the latest conveniences but instead of tv and internet, we were usually found frockling on the waterfront or catching up on summer reads beneath the pines.

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I have to say I fancied everything this lake offered… maybe a little more than other lakes we’ve visited… so far that is. It matched the flavor of my grandparents’ rustic log cabin in Virginia on the shores of the peaceful Chesapeake Bay where I spent seemingly endless summers in my childhood.

Kezar Lake

Kazar Lake Camp

Kazar Lake 2017Locals residents and summer people want to keep the lake and the camps just the way they are… quiet, clean, and rustic with all the local traditions kept in place.  A local proprietor shared the news that the King family, Stephen and Tabitha, the well-known authors who reside part-time somewhere around there, purchased the sole campground on the lake, then closed it down. That took jet-skis and lots of boats from the lake and folks couldn’t be happier. We didn’t go looking for Stephen King but folks said it’s not unusual to run into him at local establishments. I don’t think we went out shopping or eating out enough…. but, hey, I finished two books.

Kazar Lake

Kezar Lake’s water is clean, one of Maine’s cleanest lakes. The sunsets are spectacular over the White Mountains and I can’t say enough about the absolute QUIET… except for the crickets and an occasional duck or two.

Living on the Seacoast of New Hampshire, we feel so lucky that we’re mere minutes from the ocean, yet the mountains of New England are oh-so-close! Salt water? Fresh water? We love ’em both and we can take our pick any week of summer. How divine is that??

Sunset on Kazar 2017

 Only 51 days more days till spring
Oops! Boy, am I wrong. It’s 69 days as of January 10. Sigh….

Leaving on a Jet Plane…

With more snow and ice on the way for the northeast, we escaped just in time to bask in the warmth of a South Carolina sun on Hilton Head Island.


We are staying near Harbour Town at the toe of the island and much of what we’ve done so far is within walking distance…. especially the fantastic sunsets at night!


The first thing we do on the island is slow down. There are tons of bikers and walkers and we are learning to live the leisurely life style of the residents. It isn’t an island with lots of nightlife but an island laced with golf courses, tennis courts, bike rentals, walking trails, nature preserves, and 12 miles of glorious ocean beaches…. not to mention fabulous Lowcountry cuisine.

bikes-on-the-beach


If you love a live oak, this is the place to see an island full of them, covered with Spanish moss and full of resident bird life.


The island took a big hit from Hurricane Matthew and a remarkable clean up is underway on every street…including ours where we got to know one owner’s sweet pup. 


Cleanup has not interfered with island life. Roads are clear and residents are replanting.

We chose Hilton Head for just the right reasons: food, nature, relaxation. It’s a very good thing.

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Flatlanders on Vacay

Up in the Lakes Region of New Hampshire and places north, they call folks from our area and beyond, Flatlanders or “flatlandahs,” as it is properly pronounced in New Hampshire. I was well aware of the label as we ventured into the beautiful Lakes Region for a little R&R last week, but, thankfully, locals were way too polite to use the term when they inquired where we were from. I know what they were probably thinking as we snapped photographs of every fern, mountain, shop window, and covered bridge. No moose though. Two black bears…. a live one crossing the road and a stuffed one at an area restaurant.

Stuffed Bear at a Restaurant

It was a great time to travel there. Crowds gone. The highways were navigable and only the locals in the shops and restaurants.  We were between summer tourist season and Leaf Peeper season. The camp where we stayed was practically unpeopled and so very natural. No motors… only the sound of paddles dipping in the water. Blue skies. Gorgeous sunsets.

Kayaking

Paddling out to meet the sunset

There were six of us and about 6,000 pickerel frogs, a resident snake, one noisy chipmunk scolding us during the day, the piercing rattle of the Belted Kingfisher giving us morning wakeup, and the echos across the pond of loons to lullaby us to sleep at night.

Pickerel Frog

A snake stalking two pickerel frogs on the beach (lower right)

More fun than anything was watching the little ones enjoy the ‘wilderness’ adventure.

Going Fishing

Floating to the raft again...

I want that one...

Meals were easy. Deserts were often over a fire.

Our lodging was beautifully rustic, yet modernized… thank goodness. The atmosphere gave me a sense that Katharine Hepburn or Henry Fonda could walk in the door and settle down in front of the towering stone fireplace. Family albums on the shelf, family pictures through umpteen years on refrigerator, walls, and tables. Scratched wide plank flooring most likely has withstood generations of canines that were captured in old photographs. Collection of hats for any occasion adored a wall. Great ambience!

We’re so glad we were made very welcome in our camp and in the numerous towns we visited. Without a doubt, we came home refreshed and already babbling about our next trip.

My Ten Favorite Photos of 2014

Les over at A Tidewater Gardener annually posts his ten favorite photos from the year and he challenges readers to do the same. Since we have downsized and no longer maintain our acres of gardens, I’m not as serious about garden photography and rarely carry my heavy 35mm camera around my neck. But I do carry the world’s most popular camera in my pocket at all times. My iPhone! Not sure about these being my favorite photos but they jumped out at me while scrolling through hundreds!

Since we spent most of the winter under a blanket of snow, I thought I should add at least one photo of the beauty it can bring. Taken on February 8, prints in the snow show where animals come to the stream banks.

Click on photos to enlarge.

IMG_8150I love photos that tell a story and there’s one here. Peaceful demonstrators in Keene NH braved the elements for several hours for a cause on February 7. I can almost hear them talking amongst themselves…. maybe seeing whose turn it is to get some coffee.. among other more important things.

Make Love, Not War!Keene NH also provided another photo that I like. A rainy, gray day was brightened only by taillights at a stoplight on April 15. With family in Keene, we visit this area on a regular basis.

IMG_9886We ventured out of the Granite State for this photo. Two lovely ladies in straw hats were admiring a seaside garden on the rocky shores of the Atlantic. We toured several Cape Neddick Maine gardens on this day during Garden Conservancy Days, June 22.IMG_1338Anyone who knows me knows I am interested in insects and have hundreds of photos and IDs The plump fellow below, the jumping spider, claimed the watering hose as his own at Rolling Green Nursery this summer. These are brave and scary looking spiders, but, oh so harmless. Whenever I moved in, he moved closer. They stalk prey and can pounce a few inches but I just give them a puff of air and they fall to the ground and scamper away. I really like these spiders because they have personality plus. July 12.

The second photo below was a two-for-one. I was photographing the tachinid fly and didn’t see the second insect until I downloaded the photograph. The tachinid is a nectar eating fly as an adult, but one that lays eggs in insect hosts. This time the lowly hover fly is the victim seen just below her body. I don’t like these flies very much as butterfly caterpillars are often victims. July 16.

IMG_1635 IMG_0712Rain drops on vegetation after an all night soaker is always interesting to me. The new growth on this spirea is an especially nice color. May 19.

rain dropsThe sunflower below was a volunteer from our bird feeder. Several seeds that the birds overlooked germinated but only this one grew tall and straight and eventually fed the chickadees many ripe sunflower seeds. (Staring at the center long enough may hypnotize!)  August 26.

volunteer sunflowerFinally, the highlight of 2014 was a vacation with the youngins to Bethel, Maine. Below are two photos from that hiking, swimming, boating trip in August.

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New Hampshire Vacay

Standing in line for my New Hampshire driver’s license, I spotted a poster on the wall at DMV that touted “New Hampshire is 84% forested and the rest is underwater.”  Hmmmm… really? I verified the fact with an online forestry site that it is indeed 84% forested and the underwater part is obvious when looking at a Google Map of the state. Rivers, lakes, ponds, bays dot the landscape and the ocean provides a superabundance of water.

So I decided then and there to search the perfect getaway for my children, spouses, grandchildren in this land of trees and water. The words I searched  for online were peaceful setting, pristine water, native plants, hiking trails, private, rustic cabins, firepit… all within driving distance to Portsmouth for a night out or day at the ocean. And I found the perfect cabins nestled in the woods on Wild Goose Pond near Pittsfield NH.

Rustic it was. And isolated. A pristine lake. Nice and quiet. Peaceful. With a variety of boats… paddles or sails provided. At night we snuggled under down comforters and during the day we paddled, sailed, hiked, ran, swam then gathered for a plein-air dinner cooked over an open fire.

Nature in its purest surrounded us.

… spectacular sunrises and sunsets.

Adventures that delighted children (and me!) included fairy houses using old bark, twigs, acorns, rocks, moss, leaves and other natural materials.

… puzzles

… lunch from bushes,

… running, walking,

… marshmallows,

… swimming, fishing,

… and finally, hiking Mt. Major with the ultimate in views!

I think I like it here in New Hampshire!