Goodbye Summer

It’s still August but I’m learning just how short the growing season is in New Hampshire. Summer is fast shutting down. I don’t mean seeing preseason football on the telly or all those fall decorations I’m seeing in stores. It’s the plants and nature that are showing signs of ending their cycle of growth.

Our tomato plants look ratty but there are a few pink ones still hanging on. I’ve been picking the green tomatoes that are certain not to ripen. I’ve sliced, breaded, and fried them up in bacon fat as my southern roots dictate. If you’ve never tried this treat, you’d be surprised at how tasty it is. mister gardener, born and raised in Ohio, once turned his nose up at this delicacy but now can’t say not to this treat. I think we’ll be eating more as the month comes to a close.

fried green tomatoes

On a drive through Vermont last week, we noticed a few species of trees are beginning to show color. In our garden, our Little Lime hydrangea shrubs are entering the color phase of late summer and fall. The booms emerge green in the spring, turn white through the summer, and finally present a lovely blush of pink in the fall. It’s happening now and it’s beautiful.

Little Lime Hydrangea

The crickets, grasshoppers, katydids, and cicadas are sounding the calls of fall. It can get noisy out there this time of year. Spider webs are festooned across much of what grows in the garden… and with egg sacs full of little “Charlottes” ready to greet the world in the spring.

katydid

We’re seeing the birds begin to gather for their annual migration. Several of our male hummingbirds have already left. It seems early for migration but the number of males around the feeders are fewer.  We are keeping the nectar fresh for the females, the young, and those few that may wander through during migration. The nuisance around the nectar these days are the yellow jackets….. not a bee, but a pesky wasp that is drawn to sweets as the summer wanes.

yellow jacket

The sun is rising a little later and setting earlier these days bringing some refreshing cool nights. We’ve dragged out the down cover for those nights that drop into the  50’s.  I wish this time of the year lasted longer. It’s amazing to think the first frost in this part of the state can occur in less than an month!

garden gloves 2018

I love all the seasons but maybe not equally. I must admit I’ll be sad to put away my garden gloves for another long New England winter

 

 

Things are happening…

… and it seems they are happening all at once around here.

IMG_1969First, say hello to the newest member of our New Hampshire family clan. While our brand new granddaughter and her parents adjust, I have been spending more time with her big brother who is 19-months old and doesn’t quite understand how this tiny new sister can rock his world so.

Slowly, daily routines at their household are falling into place. Big bro now gives sis sweet kisses and he volunteers to assist at her bath time. Life is good.

And since my help is not as critically needed as it was 2 weeks ago, I am back to the world of babysitter-on-call, back to a little blogging and back to the world of gardening… which leads me to my next happening.

My world of gardening has stepped up a notch from almost nonexistent in a condo to grab a shovel, rake, clippers and get-to-work-all-day. I have returned to part-time work at a garden center close by, Rolling Green Nursery, a gardening business with an earth friendly philosophy.

Rolling Green NurseryMy two bosses out in the perennial area are 20-somethings who are hard-working but fabulous and fun to be around. Here is Emily:

IMG_0229And here is Heidi:

IMG_0232New Hampshire can still be very cold one day and warm the next and wet the next. The garden center is slowly coming out of the deep freeze. Days at Rolling Green are spent cleaning and preparing beds and transferring tender plants from the greenhouses throughout the grounds. Life is good.

weeds!