My First Topiary

Winter weather has arrived and everything in the landscape is covered with a 2″ layer of white stuff. Some of the shrubs have been sculpted into snow topiaries. They’ll bounce back when this current snowfall melts, but those few snow topiaries remind me of the real one I had this past summer.

“Eugenia 2-Ball Topiary” is all the tag read. It was sold at every box store and grocery store around here last spring. I don’t know too much about the eugenia species. I know it’s related to the myrtle and that it can reseed readily but certainly not in New Hampshire. I thought the topiary would look great in my large urn out front giving me a touch of formality at the entrance.  The price was right so I bought one… my first topiary.

Eugenia Topiary

I came home and immediately googled eugenia and found its hardiness zone is 10-11, a semi-tropical shrub that could reach 15 to 20 feet in height and can serve as a bushy hedge in the right zone. It’s readily available in box stores and nurseries, potted and sheared as a topiary form into interesting shapes like balls, spirals, or cones. The leaves are small and delicate and respond very well to trimming. The small flowers produce red berries that attract birds but there’s a warning that berries do stain walkways. The good news is that these are much more affordable than the perennial boxwood topiaries.

It simply thrived in our entry urn with sedums filling in to cover the soil. The emerging new leaves were an attractive shiny bronze shade. After several weeks into the heat of summer, the plant actually bloomed! It never developed red berries as it does in warm climes but it seemed to be quite happy at our 70-80 degrees in partial sun.  I snipped off uneven growth all summer to maintain the ball shape.

Eugenia uniflora

As soon as fall weather arrived and temperatures dropped, it was time to say goodbye to the eugenia. If I had a nice greenhouse, I would definitely choose to overwinter it. All I have for overwintering tender plants is a garage that stays fairly mild during winter. And that’s where I’m trying to save our eugenia. It’s repotted and placed in the sunniest garage window.  Alas, it may not be enough. The plant is alive but the leaves are beginning to wither and drop. It’s not in the best of health, but I’m not giving up on it yet.

Most websites advise bringing the plant indoors in cold weather but our forced air vents beneath almost every window would have the plant dropping leaves all winter. I loved the plant enough that just may end up buying a fresh one every spring.

*Eugenia blooms photo: Forest & Kim Starr


 

Container Plants in Zone 5

In Virginia’s zone 7b, I could leave most of my container plants outside all winter. Rake some leaves over pots in a sheltered corner and they’re good till spring. It’s definitely NOT what you want to do where I live in New Hampshire…. zone 5b. I tried my southern method last winter and lost all plants and the pots. I don’t have too many container plants yet as I’m still designing my small landscape… one that involves the removal of trees, a decision made by the residents in our association. Next year I may have an all sun garden and my landscape plan will change accordingly.

My favorite container I designed this summer is a variety of sedum… some bought, some bits being swept up and discarded after cleaning up around plants at work. They’re the easiest plants to root so I threw tiny leaves into the pot when I arrived home from the garden center. Most flourished. Some grew too much and had to be transplanted to the ground.

They eventually merged into one another, blending yellows, greens, reds, and blues. They grew tall. They cascaded over the pot. It was a showstopper and I want to save it. So, today, into the unheated garage the pot has gone. Sitting in the light of a window, I’ll hope for the best for this blend of magic so it can again shine for me next summer.

Click to enlarge photos.

Greenhouse Yard Sale

When a local nursery publicized a yard sale this weekend in our 38° weather, my curiosity was piqued. So, yes, I attended a yard sale in a greenhouse yesterday. The sale was not mobbed but the customers who arrived early, like the lady below, were staking out their claims and having fun doing it.

Happy ShopperWhat did they offer for sale? Not plants like I hoped. Phooey. But there were some interesting leftovers from holidays, surplus stock, and slightly damaged garden items from last season that made it fun to poke around.

Click to enlarge

I didn’t go away with much. But I did purchase some new slip-on garden clogs, a precious little porcelain bird bud vase from Two’s Company, some garden soap, and two attractive cache pots. The pots look like they came right out of an Italian countryside and they were reduced to $2 apiece! They had about 6 or 8 left. I bought two and we went home for lunch. As we ate our noon meal, my thoughts drifted back to the attractive cache pots. Why’d I only get two? I need an odd number. Matter of fact, I want several more. I could keep my three and use the rest planted with small flowering plants as fabulous gifts.

mister gardener offered to dash back and buy at least 5 for me.  Ten minutes later he reappeared in the doorway… empty-handed. “They were gone. All of them. Sold out.”  Sad faced, I could only hear the words of my dear departed mother, the official World’s Greatest Consumer, whose shopping philosophy she oft quoted and lived by, “He who hesitates is lost.” This time she was right.

cache pots

Summertime Blues

Someone told me today that we have about 6 more weeks of summer weather in New Hampshire. Bummer!  By mid-October temperatures drop, days are shorter and the leaf peepers will begin to stream into the state.

I will miss the warmth of summer. The August calendar filled quickly.  We have traveled. We have entertained house guests. I’ve made pickles from garden fresh cucumbers. We’ve frequented farmers’ markets, celebrated the youngest grandson’s first birthday and the oldest grandson’s 18th birthday, enjoyed a big family gathering, and continued our walks.

I visited public gardens, wandered through garden nurseries, met with a landscape architect, planted a few shrubs and pulled a few weeds and crabgrass, but no real gardens on this property yet…. except for my newest garden endeavor…. container gardening!

I loved making my own, pictured somewhere below but I’ll never tell. It was also fun to photograph different planters throughout the summer travels as I passed by with my handy iPhone. It seems as though the healthiest container plants were often the tried and true hot petunias, chartreuse or purple sweet potato vine and coleus in variety of shades and variegation. I was also surprised to see pots of healthy impatiens as most good nurseries did not sell them around here because of a mildew problem.

Any favorite color combinations for you?

Some were interesting but could use a little help…

And others had gone to plant heaven.