Bug-pocalypse?

“The Windshield Phenomenon”  Have you heard of it? It was described in a New York Times article in November, 2018. Entomologists penned the name from the fact that people were noticing fewer bugs… around night lights, hitting faces while riding bikes, working in the garden, and on auto windshields.  Yes, I have noticed fewer insects and fewer birds and wonder if there’s a link between the two.

Bumblebee 2018

A German entomological study in 2017 found that insects in nature reserves had decreased by 75 percent over the 27 years that they have been collecting information. The New York Times article stated, “Scientists are still cautious about what the findings might imply about other regions of the world. But the study brought forth exactly the kind of longitudinal data they had been seeking, and it wasn’t specific to just one type of insect. The numbers were stark, indicating a vast impoverishment of an entire insect universe, even in protected areas where insects ought to be under less stress. The speed and scale of the drop were shocking even to entomologists who were already anxious about bees or fireflies or the cleanliness of car windshields.

Most people don’t pay much attention to insects except for the pretty ones like butterflies or the ones that bite like mosquitoes or ticks. Some insects can be pests, but most insects are not. Not only do they pollinate 35% of the world’s crops, they help decompose organic matter and are the main food source for many birds, reptiles, amphibians, bats, fish, and small mammals. They’re a critical member of the food chain.

Swallowtail caterpillar

I was encouraged at a recent neighborhood association meeting where the board decided not to apply lawn herbicides due to wetland restrictions. However, because of the increased tick population and as a preventative for ants and termites, they will spray pesticides along the edge of the woods and around the building foundations… probably every home foundation but mine.

I will protect the small habitat here and make it hospitable for insects, insects like the katydids that still populate this garden. I heard their raspy calls in the summer. They are nocturnal insects, but occasionally they appear during the day.
The male Fork-tailed bush katydid (Scudderia furcata):

male katydid 2018

And below, the female Fork-tailed bush katydid (Scudderia furcata) with the telltale anatomy of the female. She uses her serrated ovipositor to delicately insert her eggs between the layers of a leaf’s edge.

female katydid 2018

2018 Fork-tailed bush katydid (Scudderia furcata)

One more interesting note… there is a tiny slit visible on each of her front legs. Those are her “ears” that she uses to listen for the call of the male katydid.

These healthy insects and many others are important links in the backyard food chain. Even though adult birds may eat seeds, it’s insects like these that are fed to their young…. not seeds.  So until we know and understand more about a possible “insect apocalypse,” I guard this tiny habitat and no herbicides or pesticides will be used here.

 

Another Uninvited Visitor

I’ve discovered another insect in New Hampshire that I never met in Virginia. At first I thought it was an unusual Japanese beetle but, no, it’s a relative… same size but different markings. According to UNH Cooperative Extension, this is the invasive Asiatic garden beetle or Oriental beetle (Exomala orientalis) that was first discovered in the US in the early 1920’s. It is found in most of New England although it has moved as far as South Carolina and west to Indiana and probably still spreading. It feeds off the roots of grasses as a grub and the adult can attack garden plants.

Click to enlarge photos.

oriental beetleI think it’s actually kind of a cute looking little beetle… and “about the size and shape of a coffee bean,” says cooperative extension. Cute looking, but does damage as a grub to the lawn, then in June and July, it emerges from the soil to mate and eat. Adults generally eat little but stick around all summer nibbling in the garden.

oriental beetleAfter mating, the females burrow into the soil to lay eggs that hatch in about 2 weeks. UNH states that rarely are chemical controls needed for these grubs in New Hampshire. Japanese beetle grubs in this state are more destructive than the Asian beetle grubs, however the USGA says it’s the most important white grub species in turfgrass in New Jersey, southeastern New York, Connecticut, and Rhode Island and causes major damage in ornamental nursery stock.

oriental beetleI do not see damage on many leaves or blooms in our little gardens. I’ve read that favorite foods are leaves and the petals of daisies, hollyhock, roses, phlox, petunias, sugarcane, and blueberries, cranberries, raspberries, peaches and sweet potatoes. Whew! I don’t have any of those!

Often overlooked in the yard because they are not good flyers like Japanese beetles and are nocturnal, doing all flying and mating at night. An Integrated Pest Management system that traps and disrupts mating with an in-ground pheromone lure for the adult male beetle may be my solution if it gets worse. The lures are good for 6 weeks but must be emptied weekly.

I wonder what new insect I’ll meet next….