Just south of the Mason-Dixon Line

Oh boy, was it fun to connect with my “roots” in Virginia for several days. My adorable niece was married last Saturday in Richmond.  mister gardener and I flew down for the lovely event and extended our stay to catch up with family (and plant life) just below the Mason-Dixon Line in the Piedmont area of Virginia.

The horizon was totally green under hazy skies as we descended for landing, trees fully leafed out, green, green, green, way ahead of the landscape in New Hampshire. That always amazes me. It’s just an hour and 20 minutes by plane.

Richmond VirginiaWe generally drop our luggage at the home of one of my brothers and wife in Richmond…. a couple who always make us feel right at home in their beautiful 19th century home that they have lovingly restored… all by themselves for the most part!

Richmond VA

Richmond

Edwards Virginia Ham

And first things first…. the most gracious Virginia hospitality includes what we have been craving…. Edwards Virginia Ham on warm buttered biscuits!

Edwards Ham is the salty type, a country ham that perhaps will seem too salty if one hasn’t grown up with it as a staple in the home. As for me, this wonderful ham has spoiled me for any ham I’ve tasted since.

Sadly, this unique Surry, Virginia ham company burned to the ground a year ago. While the insurance is being settled, the ham is being prepared and aged at other ham facilities across the country. Lucky for us!

Another priority in the south before you are unpacked and settled is a garden tour. This is a brother and wife who love and live just to be in the garden. I blogged about their gardens a few years ago. This is also the brother who saved the crow and that was quite an exciting story! Those blogs are two of my most read blogs and most ‘lifted’ photos from my blog… (that I willingly share if given credit for them).

The garden house my brother built from his own design (and where he hid from the attacking crow) always receives a lot of interest. For sure, he missed his calling as an architect. He is amazing and that’s no exaggeration from this sister!

The garden house looks great from any angle, even our bedroom window.

It’s fun on each visit to see what’s new in this fabulous garden. I told a blogging friend who photographed a door in another garden, that I knew a person with a garden door and this is the place! The fence and an old door were added to stop the deer from nibbling the azaleas. What a great garden accent! I love the RED.

Garden Door, Richmond VA

Everywhere you look there is nature looking back. I loved this sweet scene beneath the pergola he built last summer. It is covered with a lovely purple wisteria where wrens live in the house and robins are raising young practically on top of the wren house…. sort of condo style.

Wrens and Robins!

What will we look forward to on the next garden tour? They are planning another outhouse in the garden. This small one will be for the mower, weed eater, and blower. He’s already begun the foundation using discarded lumber from a neighbors deck. “What will it look like?” I asked. It will be a chip off the other garden house and he sketched it for me in a flash. The roof will be tin and atop the weathervane will be a copper bird dog, our family’s favorite pooch.

I can hardly wait for my next visit….

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Architecture, History & Trees

Every time I pass one particular home on our road, I have to be careful. The site is so spectacular that my eyes cannot help but stray from the road toward the site on the hill. It is eye candy for an architecture, history, and tree devotee like me. The farmhouse itself is old, dating from 1733 with the large addition below added in the 1780’s. The sign on the porch reads 1780.

The house is amazing but two things that actually cause me to drive off the road are the massive trees from the 1780’s that flank the porch. They honestly take your breath away. Every time we pass when mister gardener is at the wheel, I snap photographs to look at later.

Here are a few I’ve taken in warmer seasons of the year. Photos can’t accurately portray the size of these two maples but in researching, I found that the tree on the right is the largest sugar maple in the state of New Hampshire. The limb that juts out at a 90 degree angle is larger than most sugar maples attain in a lifetime. Click the photos to enlarge.

This Federal period farmhouse from the 1780’s has 2 1/2 stories, a typical I-house with a gable and chimney at each end and one room deep. The entryway above has the half sidelights and the transom, both visible in the photos. The siding is original. An ell, so common in New England, connects the home to the c. 1733 home on the property. On our drive yesterday (before the big snowfall), I photographed the home from a side road where the view of the original farmhouse is visible.

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I have photographs of the trees in fall as well and it’s an amazing sight. I’ll let you just use your imagination.

In looking at historic maps from the area, I see the home noted and the name of the early inhabitants. But since the 1950’s, a family of 12 children spent their childhood there and several still live there and close by. But this is the “small world” fact I recently discovered when researching. The realtor who sold us our home in Exeter was one of those 12 children. I love it when I can connect the dots like that….