Rogue Bunny

He/She is big, fat and hungry. My neighbors have seen this big bunny in the neighborhood and I’m not sure a dog/cat/owl/hawk/fox, etc. would tackle it, they say. Last year’s good bunny, Ferdinand, who only ate grass and clover has been replaced by a garden rogue. Ferdinand never nibbled any plants, even left alone my lettuce or parsley, but the new bunny wants all the good stuff like the newly planted colorful violas blooms around the borders and in pots here and there… like around my fav bunny below.

violas 2019

Today I walked out and saw this:

violas gone 2019

And this…

Every johnny-jump-up bloom and bud in the garden was eaten…. except on one small viola.ย  I quickly protected the last little blooms. If you look around in the photo, you’ll see all my crocus has been eaten along with the tulips and grape hyacinths greens.

violas-2019

I have yet to see this big bunny that several neighbors have spotted because smart bunny dines in my yard under the cover of darkness. And never having had a rabbit problem in the past, I’m somewhat baffled.ย  Today I will research ways to rabbit-proof the gardens or find out what they don’t like to eat.ย  Any suggestions, aside from harming it, are welcome.

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Rainy day outing

It’s too wet and rainy to spend much time out in the garden this week. What is there to do in our area on a very soggy day? Eat lunch out and visit a salvage shop. For the limited population we have around here, I’m amazed that we have not one, but two salvage shops. One warehouse and yard is large and a couple of miles out of town and the other is downtown in Exeter where I stopped in yesterday.

architectural salvage inc 2019

These places are great to not only reminisce with a smile, but also a fantastic site for finding treasures with character for the garden…. gates, fences, statues, old bricks, crocks, birdbaths, and classic treasures for the home.

Today I was limited to certain areas of the shop due to a young couple who arrived in a flurry accompanied by their building contractor and their architect with loosely rolled and slightly rain-wet home plans tucked under her arms.

Kitchen and bath supplies always seem to take up a lot of space in salvage shops and this place is no different. There are two little sinks on a shelf below that I can envision in a garden potting bench at my home!

Old wood doors of all shapes and sizes seem to take up much of the space too. I was impressed when my creative daughter purchased a tall vintage door at a salvage warehouse near her home and repurposed it into a handsome king-sized headboard. Unique possibilities are endless for the inspired.

Not only do we have salvage shops, this area is teeming with antique and vintage shops and barns in and around Exeter, always desired destinations in rain or shine. What fun it is to bring home high quality and timeless treasures from these vintage stores. And it’s yet one more good way to recycle!

vintage shop -Exeter- moved to home

Spring has sprung!

It’s definitely spring on the seacoast of New Hamphire although the thermometer doesn’t always reflect the season. Last night dipped into the mid-twenties. Water in the birdbaths are frozen solid this morning and blades of grass in the lawn are frozen stiff. Those temps won’t last long today. The thermometer will rise to comfortable mid-40’s, perfect for a brisk walk and perhaps a bit of fussing in the garden.

We’ve had rare nice days of 50’s and 60’s with blue skies and sunshine that lured me out for a little garen work. I’ve done most of the spring edging on the borders. I’ve trimmed and pruned. I’ve done a little cleanup but not too much leaf removal until we have steady temperatures in the 50’s to protect any insects that might winter over in the leaf litter. I’m careful of not working in too wet and squishy ground, too, as too much treading will squeeze ozygen from the soil.

Except for buds swelling, there is not much to see in these borders. No blooms but the crocus greens are above ground… and promply nibbled down by a bunny we have yet to see. The only signs are what he leaves behind in small piles in the lawn. That’s not the only wild visitor to the garden area. Early morning on April Fools Day, I spotted a larger plant-loving animal grazing nearby. I’ll have to watch this fella near the arborvitae as another name of arborvitae is ‘deer candy.’

Deer April 1 2019

I won’t have to worry about rabbits or deer grazing one of the first greens above ground….several plants in the onion family. We see chives, garlic chives, and the ornamental allium greens that are not fazed by the cold. I have two varieties of allium and love both. The allium ‘Giganteum’ was moved in the fall to a more protected area. The sturdy scapes can be up to 4′ tall with a dense round flower head. With that height, they needed a protected area between shrubs and out of the big winds.

allium 'gigantheum'

The allium ‘Millenium’ below grows as a compact mass of rosy round blooms about a foot in height that appear mid-summer giving us over a month of glorious blooms and shiny green foilage that persist following the blooms. I have divided my clumps a few times and fussing over several in pots, hoping to have them ready for our garden club auction in June.

allium 'millenium' spring 2019

All the often overlooked plants in the onion family are carefree, drought resistant, pest-free, easy to grow, and greatly attract butterflies, bees and other pollinators. We have a lot of bumblebees that visit but have not seen a honeybees for a couple of summers. Hallelujah, a friend and nearby neighbor is a brand new beekeeper. We have seen the early scouts from her hive several times and I know they’ll be back for all I offer in this garden all summer… including the blooms in the onion family!